Fort A.P. Hill Fire Medics seize opportunity to help accident victim

New Fire Medic Peter M. Orioles (left) and Fire Medic Dana A. Nichols were each given a commander’s coin for their selfless service and quick response at the scene of an traffic accident off post.

New Fire Medic Peter M. Orioles (left) and Fire Medic Dana A. Nichols were each given a commander’s coin for their selfless service and quick response at the scene of an traffic accident off post.

FORT A.P. HILL, Va. – Fire Medic Peter M. Orioles was returning from an ambulance training run to Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center in Spotsylvania County around 4 p.m. on Oct. 9 when he and his partner, Fire Medic Dana A. Nichols, came upon a traffic accident at the intersection of Tidewater Trail and Thornton Road in Spotsylvania County.

Orioles is the newest firefighter and Intermediate Life Support medic at Fort A.P. Hill. Part of his indoctrination is to learn the routes to the nearby medical centers.

“We pulled up behind a tractor trailer and thought we were waiting for a school bus,” Nichols said. “When we pulled up a little further, we saw a motorcycle lying on its side with two people kneeling next to the rider. That’s when it clicked for us, the accident had just occurred. We hit the lights and went to work.”

The two firefighters stayed on scene until Spotsylvania County Fire and Emergency Services arrived and took over patient care.

 

U.S. Army Garrison Fort A.P. Hill commander Lt. Col. David A. Meyer recognized the two firefighters before the garrison command and staff meeting on Oct. 14.

“The call came in backwards, usually the county asks for help from us. This time, it was our guys, out in the county, asking for help from the county,” Meyers said.

Meyer thanked the two firefighters and gave each a commander’s coin for their selfless service and quick response at the accident scene.

Firefighter Orioles summed up his feelings on the day and being at Fort A.P. Hill.

“I just received an award after being here for three days; I think I am going to like this place.”

Posted in Garrison news | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

What’s in your emergency supply Kit?

Written by Mr. Sigmund E. Evans, Installation Emergency manager, Fort A.P. Hill.

A disaster supplies kit is simply a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency. Try to assemble your kit well in advance of an emergency. You may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you. You will probably not have time to search for the supplies you need or shop for them. You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water and other supplies in sufficient quantity to last for at least 72 hours. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days. Additionally, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment and telephones may be cut off for days or even a week, or longer. Your supplies kit should contain items to help you manage during these outages.

Recommended Supplies (not all inclusive) to include in a Basic Kit (*Some items can be dangerous, so please have an adult collect and maintain those items):

- Water, one gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation
- Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
- Battery-powered radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both
- Flashlight and extra batteries*
- First Aid kit
- Whistle to signal for help
- Infant formula and diapers, if you have an infant
- Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
- Dust mask or cotton t-shirt, to help filter the air
- Plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
- Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
- Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)

Clothing and Bedding:

If you live in a cold weather climate, you must think about warmth. It is possible that the power will be out and you will not have heat. Rethink your clothing and bedding supplies to account for growing children and other family changes. One complete change of warm clothing and shoes per person, including:

- A jacket or coat
- Long pants
- A long sleeve shirt
- Sturdy shoes
- A hat and gloves
- A sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person
- Rain gear
- Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils
- Cash or traveler’s checks, change
- Paper towels
- Fire Extinguisher
- Tent
- Compass
- Matches in a waterproof container*
- Signal flare*
- Paper, pencil
- Personal hygiene items including feminine supplies
- Disinfectant*
- Household chlorine bleach* – You can use bleach as a disinfectant (diluted nine parts water to one part bleach), or in an emergency you can also use it to treat water. Use 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
- Medicine dropper
- Important Family Documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container

Customize your kit to meet specific needs, such as medications and infant formula.

Posted in Garrison news | Leave a comment

New Fort A.P. Hill commander ‘excited to come to work every day’

Lt. Col. David Meyer

Lt. Col. David Meyers photo and article appeared in the Caroline Progress, Wednesday, September 10, 2014. Sarah Vogelsong CP Reporter.

When Lt. Col. David Meyer replaced Pete Dargle as garrison commander of Fort A.P. Hill this May, he assumed responsibility for 76,000 acres and a constantly revolving group of active-duty soldiers from the Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force, as well as reservists, National Guard members, and employees of federal agencies. But although the scope of this task may sound daunting to civilians, for Meyer, one of the biggest adjustments has been getting used to the visibility of his role.

“I see Sheriff Lippa at the Food Lion, and the man stops and talks to me—he’s the county sheriff!” said Meyer, sitting in his new but already ship-shape office at the garrison headquarters on a sunny afternoon. “I’m just that dude that lives on A.P. Hill.”

Meyer may be, as he describes himself, a “pretty normal” man, but he’s one with a distinguished track record. A native of Central Maryland, for him, military service was a childhood dream turned reality.

“I’ve wanted to be in the Army my entire life,” he said. “This was all I ever wanted to do.”

His plans for a military career were sharpened both by his time in the ROTC program at Frostburg State University, an education that he received thanks to an ROTC scholarship, and by the first Gulf War, launched when he was a college freshman in 1990, which roused in him a passion for tanks. That commitment set him on a path up through the ranks of the Army, garnering along the way such decorations as two Bronze Stars and five Meritorious Service Medals, among many others.

Today, Meyer is still technically an armor officer, although, he said, “I haven’t touched a tank in about 12 years, because the Army figured out that I was okay at leading staffs of people to solve complex problems.”

Complex problem-solving, said Meyer, lies at the heart of Army training—and, of course, is integral to the mission of Fort A.P. Hill, which serves as the training area for the national capital region and the mid-Atlantic.

“We train for uncertainty,” said Meyer. “We train for complexity. We train so that it doesn’t matter what you encounter, you’ve got the basic skills you need, and you’ve got the trained, creative leadership you need to pick the right solution and execute (it).”

The value of exceptional training is a lesson that he learned firsthand through three overseas deployments. Sent twice to Baghdad and once to Kandahar in Afghanistan, Meyer had what he calls the “great luck” to be present for both the Iraq surge of 2007–08 and the Afghanistan surge of 2010–11.

“I’ve been in very dangerous places, and I’ve seen what well-trained, well-led soldiers are capable of,” he said. “You can change everything. You can change a country.”

And although the Middle East might seem very far from Caroline County, the lessons that Meyer learned there about both training and how to work closely with local governments proved invaluable in preparing him for his command of A.P. Hill, as did his last position teaching ROTC as a professor of military science at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a campus located about 50 miles from Pittsburgh.

“Tip O’Neill said it best: ‘All politics is local,’” said Meyer. “The physical issues are probably pretty different in Kandahar City than (they are) in Bowling Green or Caroline, but at the end of the day, our Board of Supervisors want what’s best for their district, I want what’s best for our post and our training population, and those two goals largely align.”

The strong relationship between A. P. Hill and Caroline County fostered by outgoing commander Lt. Col. Dargle is one that Meyer said he plans to continue to maintain and, if anything, expand.

“(Dargle) and I were raised by a lot of the same bosses,” said Meyer. “We see the Army largely the same way.”

So closely have Dargle and Meyer’s careers overlapped, in fact, that Meyer’s assumption of the post of garrison commander in May was not the first, but the second time he had taken over a post from his colleague: in 2008, Meyer relieved Dargle as second-in-command of a 1,000-man battalion in Baghdad. In explaining this strange twist of fate, Meyer fell back on a popular military adage: “The Army is the smallest 1,000-man organization you’ll ever meet,” he said, laughing.

In maintaining the close ties between the county and the fort, Meyer said that he plans to put particular focus on listening and taking into account local expertise.

“You’ve got to listen to somebody to know what they want,” he said. “Nobody’s got a corner on good ideas or the truth.”

One advantage of A.P. Hill that he emphasized was the continuity of the civilian workforce that staffs the fort, some 75 percent of whom come from Caroline or within one county of Caroline.

“The experience they have, the knowledge they have, the continuity they bring to that, is one of the reasons we can be as successful as we are year in, year out, routinely, and one of the reasons people keep wanting to come back,” Meyer said. Keeping that in mind, he described the attitude that he’s taken toward his first eight weeks as garrison commander as “If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.”

Meyer’s passion for the task before him overseeing the smooth operation of the fort was palpable, as was his excitement at being in Caroline County. In his eight weeks at the fort, his family has already begun to settle in. His wife swims every morning at the YMCA, he said, and both of his children are enrolled in Caroline County Public Schools, his daughter at Caroline High School and his son at Caroline Middle School.

“I’m just excited to come to work every day,” he said. “This is not a job like any other I’ve ever had. I’m forever changed by it in just eight weeks. … It gets me fired up, because I like complexity, I like challenges, I like talking to people, I like telling the Army story. … The Army’s a people business: it’s about people, and it’s about our workforce and their families and the community. So I’m just excited that I get to go out and represent the Army and tell the Army’s story every day.” He paused for a moment to reflect on that. “That’s cool, man.”


Ref: http://www.carolineprogress.com/index.php/new-fort-a-p-hill-commander-excited-to-come-to-work-every-day/

Posted in Garrison news | Leave a comment

2014-15 Fort A.P. Hill Hunting, Trapping and Fishing Regulations

Fort A.P. Hill Hunting Fishing and Trapping regulations

Sportsman,

The 2014-15 Fort A.P. Hill Hunting, Trapping and Fishing Regulations are now available at the Fish and Wildlife Office at Anderson Camp and the Visitor Control Center; one copy per customer.

Fort A.P. Hill has changed both how it sells permits and its sign-in program.

The Fort A.P. Hill iSportsman system is now up and running.  Please visit www.faph.isportsman.net  for further information about the system. 

To register through iSportsman, go to the website or the kiosk by the A.P. Hill Visitor Control Center and create a user profile. You must also complete the background check and weapons registration form and email it to the VCC.  Make sure that this form is electronically signed. Instructions on how to sign are on the website and kiosk. 

 The electronic form is designed to speed the process and allows the VCC personnel to process the background checks during slower periods.

 You may also stop by the VCC to fill out a paper copy of the background check and weapons registration form. 

After you submit your registration, background check and weapons registration forms to the VCC, before you can hunt, fish or trap, you must still stop by the VCC, show a valid identification card (driver’s license, government identification card) and pick up your weapons registration certificate.  The VCC office will activate your user profile in the iSportsman system and you may then purchase and print your 2014-15 hunting permits and parking pass. 

If you have any questions or feedback about the online iSportsman program, or the regulations, please feel free to call 804-633-8984.

Posted in Environmental, Garrison news | Leave a comment

August 2014 Commander’s Cup Update

The Fort A.P. Hill Commander’s Cup is moving into its sixth month with the Naval Special Warfare Group leading, the Fort A.P. Hill Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation jumping into second and in third the Fort A.P. Hill Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security.

F and MWR moved into second place after a strong showing in the rock wall climb and spool roll competition.

The eight-month Commander’s Cup program features a variety of team and individual events held in locations across the garrison. Events remaining are the 3-point shootout, power lifting, Wilcox circuit challenge and the elliptical challenge.

Points are awarded for performance and participation. At the conclusion of the program, the team with the most points will be declared winner and will keep the Commander’s Cup Trophy.

The Fort A.P. Hill 2014 Commander’s Cup Trophy teams are: Headquarters, F and MWR, DPRMS, Logistics Readiness Center, Directorate of Public Works, Directorate of Emergency Services, McMahon Explosive Ordinance Disposal Training Center, Network Enterprise Center, Night Vision Laboratory, Asymmetric Warfare Group, Naval Special Warfare Group, 310th and 411th Engineers, 91st Troop Command (USAR) and the 1-322nd Logistics Support Battalion.

September Calendar (<<Download the Calendar for the Commander’s Cup events for September 2014.)

Posted in Garrison fitness, Garrison news | Leave a comment

Commander’s Cup

Points are awarded for performance and participation.

Points are awarded for performance and participation.

The Fort A.P. Hill Commander’s Cup is moving into its fifth month with the Naval Special Warfare Group leading, the McMahon Explosive Ordinance Disposal Training Center in second and the Fort A.P. Hill Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security in third place.

The eight-month program consists of a variety of team and individual events held in locations across the garrison. All directorates and tenant organizations are encouraged to form teams to participate in events such as archery, golf, baking contest, 5-kilometer run and walk. Individuals can also count their workout miles (run, walk, bicycle) toward their directorate’s total.

Points are awarded for performance and participation. At the conclusion of the program, the team with the most points will be declared winner and will keep the Commander’s Cup Trophy.

The Fort A.P. Hill 2014 Commander’s Cup Trophy teams are as follows: Headquarters, Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security, Logistics Readiness Center, Directorate of Public Works, Directorate of Emergency Services, McMahon Explosive Ordinance Disposal Training Center, Network Enterprise Center, Night Vision Laboratory, Asymmetric Warfare Group, Naval Special Warfare Group, 310th and 411th Engineers, 91st Troop Command (USAR) and the 1-322nd Logistics Support Battalion.

Posted in Garrison fitness, Garrison news | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment